Tag Archives: banaji

Banaji on Reconstructing Historical Materialism

“What I‘d like to do in this paper is raise the general issue of how we can develop historical materialism in more powerful ways than Marxists have tried to do since the sixties. The general issue is addressed by raising … Continue reading

Posted in History | Tagged | Leave a comment

Banaji Talk

An extemporaneous, yet typically wide-ranging and gripping talk by Banaji that ranges from his historical analysis of Indian struggle to Marx, to shopping malls, Pasolini and back:

Posted in Political Marxism | Tagged | Leave a comment

Banaji on Debt.

If memory serves David Graeber referred to the work of Jairus Banaji in several of his responses to criticisms of Debt. Graeber rightly pointed out that Banaji’s work departs from the model of the ideal average that Marx provides in … Continue reading

Posted in Value | Tagged , | 3 Comments

Notes on Postone II: What is meant by history?

Short note on TLSD. It strikes me that Postone also lets the idea of ‘history’ do a lot of heavy lifting for him. On one hand much of his re-interpretation of Marx is premised on his account of Marx’s historically … Continue reading

Posted in Marxology | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Banaji on Capital and Marxist history.

Here is what I think is an important concluding paragraph from Banaji’s essay on Late Antiquity to the Middle Ages that highlights what I think is (1) the properly Marxian way to approach history in terms of the logic or … Continue reading

Posted in Marx | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Marx on Debt, Capital and Primitive Accumulation.

Reckon Banaji’s Deutscher Prize lecture–and his work in History and Theory–were influenced by this brilliant passage: The public debt becomes one of the most powerful levers of primitive accumulation. As with the stroke of an enchanter’s wand, it endows barren … Continue reading

Posted in Marx, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Banaji on the Dialectic and the laws of moition in Capital.

For Marx, as his approval of Kaufman’s review indicates, the dialectic was, more specifically, a science of the laws of motion of the ‘social process’, profoundly historical by its very nature, not only in that it guided only the investigation … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment